John Alexander Farrell

John Alexander Farrell

F/S John Alexander Farrell, flying with the Moose Squadron, of the R.C.A.F., took off on a bombing raid on Dortmund, Germany, on May 5, 1943, and his plane, a Halifax bomber, failed to return to its English base. He was thus presumed dead, and some time later it was learned that he had been buried on May 8, in the municipal cemetery at Kirchhellen, 11 miles northwest of Essen, Germany. With his passing, his father, Mr. Steve Farrell, 16 College St., lost his only child and a very dear son. As a rear gunner he had made other operations over enemy territory, including one to the Baltic, and his superior officers praised his steadiness and efficiency, and his comrades mourned the loss of a good friend. A bright and promising career seemed in store for F/S Farrell, because by personality and temperament he was suited to his job. Born in Brantford on September 20, 1920, Alex, as he was called, attended Bell view and Ryerson Schools and graduated from the Brantford Collegiate Institute and Vocational School. He attended Colborne Street United Church, and was also a member of the Y.M.C.A. On October 30, 1941, he enlisted in the Canadian Army and was at No. 20 C.I.B.T.C., here until January 6, 1942, when he transferred to the R.C.A.F. He trained at Toronto and Mount Hope and then graduated from the Bombing and Gunnery School at Jarvis, September 29, 1942. After a furlough of 28 days, he left for England, arriving there on November 9. The young airman was mentioned in overseas news dispatches as taking part in the great R.A.F.-R.C.A.F. raid which showered tons of bombs on the German inland port of Duisberg. Prior to his R.C.A.F. days, he clerked at the Loblaw Groceteria. His promotion to flight sergeant came after his death.

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