Roy Henry Williams

Roy Henry Williams

Not as a subject, but as an ally, Pte. Roy Henry Williams, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Williams, R.R. 1, Ohsweken, donned the King's uniform when he enlisted with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry on November 14, 1941, following the example set by his father who, in the First Great War, joined the 125th Battalion, here. His loyalty was to cost Pte. Williams his life, and he fell in action on August 12, 1944, between Falaise and Caen, France. His particular job was driving a Bren gun carrier and his unit commander, Capt. D. Mackay, paid high tribute to his courage and gallantry during that fierce campaign, when the casualties among the Canadians were tragically heavy. Born, July 1, 1920, Pte. Williams went to school on the Six Nations Indian Reserve and attended the Anglican Church there. He was active in the Sunday School and took part in all the church entertainments, his pleasing voice making him a happy addition to the group. He followed this special interest throughout his life and made a hobby of collecting songs. He enjoyed the abundant outdoor life the Reserve offered and, like most of its boys, was proficient in hunting and fishing. He had another hobby, rather an unusual one for a member of the sterner sex, he liked to cook and on one occasion, one of his cakes was served at a church supper. After his schooldays, he worked on the home farm up to a short time before his enlistment, when he was with the Cromar Construction Company, Ltd. His service training took place at Newmarket and Camp Borden, and in April, 1942, he was moved to England.

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