William John Strickland

William John Strickland

Pte. William John Strickland in civilian life was a quiet type of man but he was industrious and it was because of this characteristic that he had a wide circle of friends. Besides his employment at the Brantford Cordage Company, he acted as a steward at the Brantford Golf and Country Club and at the Officers' Mess at the Dufferin and Haldimand Rifles Armories on Brant Avenue. But all that belonged to peacetime and when war came, he enlisted in 1940 with the Highland Light Infantry, Galt, and the following year went overseas. Then came the years of training for the Canadians in England until the continental invasion in the early summer of 1944. A month later, on July 8, 1944, Pte. Strickland lost his life at the battle of Zuron in the Caen sector of France. He was a stretcher bearer of "6" Company and his superior officer described his work as "the most dangerous but noblest of all duties". "Throughout that terrible day," the account continued, "he worked with utter disregard for self, binding up the wounds of comrades. He had been slightly wounded earlier in the day but rather than retire to safety he continued to minister to others." The valor of Pte. Strickland, whose wife, the former Miss Rose Kempa, lives at 25 Alonzo St., was officially recognized and Mrs. Strickland was presented with the Certificate of Honor personally signed by Field Marshal B. L. Montgomery, who commended her husband's outstanding service and great devotion to duty. As a boy, Pte. Strickland attended King Edward School. When he was married, he joined St. Basil's Church, of which his wife was a member. Their daughter is Marilyn Ann. He is also survived by his mother, Mrs. R. Strickland.

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