Franklyn Martin

Franklyn Martin

L/Sgt. Franklyn Martin had the distinction of being the first resident of the Oakland Community to enlist with the Canadian Army in the Second Great War and was the first and only fatal casualty of that community and the first from the Six Nations Indian Reservation. He heeded the call to service in October, 1939, when he enlisted with the Dufferin and Haldimand Rifles of Canada (Reserve) and went active in April, 1940, when he was transferred to the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry. He was in Canada only a few months afterwards, sailing for England with his unit in July. Then began the long and arduous service of training which had its climax in the battle of Dieppe, France, August 19, 1942, when the pattern for future invasion landings was fashioned by those 2nd Division Canadians. L/Sgt. Martin was reported missing after the raid and was officially presumed dead in July, 1945. Born on the Reserve on April 23, 1908, he was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Martin. Attending Public School in Oakland and Continuation School in Scotland, L/Sgt. Martin completed his education at the Robinson Business College, Waterford. For some time he was employed as a clerk in the Indian Office at Brantford, until he decided to relinquish his post in favor of building steel barns with Bill Davis, Oakland. He had been successful in the business field, but in his new job he was equally proficient and with his employer travelled all around the countryside erecting buildings. On February 24, 1934, he was married to Miss Jean Gaetz, Waterford. In Oakland they were members of the United Church. As a hobby, he collected stamps. He was also interested in playing hockey and badminton.

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