Warren Francis Patrick Maloney

Warren Francis Patrick Maloney

In its way, one of the most tragic deaths here recorded was that of C.S.M. Warren Francis Patrick Maloney, 26 years of age, because, while Brantfordites were joyously celebrating the cessation of hostilities on VJ-Day, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Maloney, 25 Elgin Street, received the news that he had died three hours after a motor vehicle accident in Holland. He was returning to his station in Brussels in a jeep when it came into collision with a wagon and spun around on the road hitting a tree on the side of the vehicle where C.S.M. Maloney was sitting. The grief of his comrades and the sorrow they suffered when he left them was well demonstrated in the impressive military funeral ceremony conducted in Tilburg, Holland. It was also seen in some measure in a letter received by his mother from his Royal Hamilton Light Infantry Company Commander, Captain H. A. Oliver and to which was appended the names of 81 of his comrades. It described in detail the place C.S.M. Maloney held in their esteem. He was a big man, six feet two inches tall and weighed 230 pounds, but his frame was no greater than his friendly heart and his valor. Enlisting on June 29, 1940, he trained in Canada for two and a half years and served overseas for almost three years, going into Normandy on D-Day and fighting in France, Holland and Germany. Born in Owen Sound, C.S.M. Maloney was educated in St. Basil's School and at the local High School. He attended St. Basil's Church. He was fond of sports, being particularly adept at left-handed pitching and at bowling. He earned his living at the Brantford Cordage Company, Ltd.

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